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2022 Dead of the Winter Cultural Series

All tickets include wine, beer, and refreshments on the Ames Chapel’s lower level and meets-and-greets with the talent. Photo ID and proof of vaccination must be presented at the door for admittance, and masks must be worn during performances (but not during the lower-level after-parties).

Mona Awad ~ Best-selling author of All’s Well

No paper tickets. All names will be checked off at the door.

Awad’s previous novels, Bunny and 13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl, garnered accolades from media outlets ranging from The New York Times to The New Yorker, Vogue, and Vanity Fair. Now she is out with the just-released All’s Well, which O, the Oprah Magazine calls a “sparkling ballad to the bard” and “a dream of a novel.” The Washington Post says of this book that “”Awad’s writing isn’t merely intoxicating. It’s incandescent.” And Time Magazine calls All’s Well “a darkly hilarious journey into the psyche of a woman approaching her breaking point.” Come hear Awad speak, read from, and answer questions about All’s Well and the writer’s life. Books will be available on sale courtesy of Buttonwood Books & Toys, and Awad will be happy to sign them.

The talk starts at 7 pm, but come at 6:30. You need a drink.

Photo ID and proof of vaccination must be presented at the door for admittance, and masks must be worn during performances (but not during the lower-level after-parties).

Neal Thompson ~ Best-selling author of The First Kennedys

No paper tickets. All names will be checked off at the door.

We are all familiar with the glamour of the Kennedys. But who were the Kennedys who made that initial crossing o’er the pond to put down roots in the U.S. and help erect the scaffolding that got the family mystique up and running? That’s what celebrated author and journalist Neal Thompson explores in his latest work, The First Kennedys: The Humble Roots of an American Dynasty. Of this, his sixth book, Publishers Weekly says: “An illuminating look at the earliest years of the Kennedy family in America… an engrossing, real-life rags-to-riches tale.” Kirkus Reviews calls the work “a lively biography of an iconic family before it became famous.” No surprise. Thompson has already cut his teeth on five previous highly acclaimed books, as well as articles in venues including The New York Times, Vanity Fair, and Esquire. Listen while Thomspon, himself the grandson of Irish immigrants, tells how he researched the Kennedy backstory, then have a drink with him afterwards. Books available for pre-order and also at the event courtesy of Buttonwood Books & Toys. The author will sign copies. If you think you’ve heard Thompson speak before, by the way, maybe it’s because you tuned into his appearances on The Daily Show or the History Channel, or listened to him on NPR.

The talk starts at 7 pm, but come at 6:30. You need a drink.

Photo ID and proof of vaccination must be presented at the door for admittance, and masks must be worn during performances (but not during the lower-level after-parties).

The Here Comes Everybody Players

No paper tickets. All names will be checked off at the door.

James Joyce’s works performed? As musical theatre? Well, kind of. Sort of. Not really. But there is music — live Irish music played on a fiddle, woodwind instrument, and drum to add yet another dimension to stories penned by the famed novelist. And actors really do recreate scenes from Joyce’s canon. There’s even someone to explain what’s going on. The Here Comes Everybody Players theatre troupe has delighted audiences everywhere from Dublin’s Bloomsday Festival to Antwerp, Toronto, and right here in Beantown at Boston’s annual Lit Crawl. At the Ames Chapel, the performers will act out scenes from Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and Finnegan’s Wake. Just maybe, with their help, we’ll all learn why the hell that moo cow was coming down the road after all. A great night of great fun, and you can pretend the beer or wine you have with the actors and musicians after the show is a pint of Guinness.

The show starts at 7:30 pm, but doors open at 7 so you can have a drink and settle in.

Photo ID and proof of vaccination must be presented at the door for admittance, and masks must be worn during performances (but not during the lower-level after-parties).

 

Cassandre McKinley and three-piece band

No paper tickets. All names will be checked off at the door.

As a precautionary measure — and to avoid turning the Ames Chapel into a potential Petri dish — the Board of Directors at Hingham Cemetery has decided to postpone the Cassandre McKinley concert from January 8th until Saturday, April 23rd. With COVID breakthrough cases occurring even in people who have had the booster shot and the latest surge continuing to accelerate, we feel it is the safest course of action. We are sorry for this inconvenience.

Music critic John Crossett says that McKinley “carefully straddles the line between jazz and pop without ever drifting too far to one side or the other. She can sing anything set in front of her, and sing it like she owns it.” Jazz Times Magazine speaks of her “warm caramel-flavored voice — rather like Carole King via Nancy Wilson, with a layer of Aretha Franklin icing.” Comments the Boston Globe, “There’s a music style called JazzSoul…and our anointed queen is Boston native Cassandre McKinley,” adding, “the singer’s version of I Wish It Would Rain is moving enough to bring precipitation to the desert.”

Listen to her voice for yourself: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPt7ostWQBs

The show starts at 7:30 pm, but doors open at 7 so you can have a drink and settle in.

Photo ID and proof of vaccination must be presented at the door for admittance, and masks must be worn during performances (but not during the lower-level after-parties).

The Dead of Winter Arts series is made possible with a grant from the Hingham Cultural Council, which operates under the auspices of the Massachusetts Cultural Council.